Tag Archives: Writing Prompt

5 Ways to Describe Characters (without Describing Them)

5 Ways to Describe Your Character (Without Actually Describing Them)

How do you describe your characters?

Here’s an amazing writing trick:

Go to the mirror, write what you see, and…

…never, ever do that again. 

Because describing your characters with a checklist is BORING:

  • Her eyes were brown
  • And her hair was brown
  • Even her teeth were brown
  • She really should brush more often

If you want to describe the physical appearance of your characters, go see how J. K. Rowling does it.

Otherwise, keep reading. I’ll show you how to make your characters come to life…

…without writing dull, immersion-breaking, “this is how they look” paragraphs:

Continue reading 5 Ways to Describe Your Character (Without Actually Describing Them)

1st Law of Writing

The Most Important Rule of Writing?

Above the pearly gates in Writer’s Purgatory…

…there is a question painted gold, floating letters:

“What is the Most Important Rule of Writing?”

Ahead, a vaguely androgynous guardian stood over a marble lectern, scribbling in a book with gold-leafed pages.

When she saw me, a deep frown creased her otherwise flawless face.

She asked, “Do you have your answer?”

Continue reading The Most Important Rule of Writing?

How to (Actually) Cure Writer’s Block

“…There is no such thing as Writer’s block…”

At least, that’s what I keep hearing.

“It’s a lie. It’s an excuse. It doesn’t exist.”

Wrong.

Writer’s Block is real. Every writer ever has faced it.

But – there is a serious problem with calling it “Writer’s Block.”

Let me show you…

Continue reading How to (Actually) Cure Writer’s Block

Girl excited to start NaNoWriMo 2016

9 strong reasons why writers should PLUNGE into NaNoWriMo

Image courtesy of Jon Candy via Flickr Creative Commons

NaNoWriMo is the Olympics of the Writing World…

…except you are the sole representative of your country. And you have to do every single sport. Everyday.

It’s also kinda like spending a month in solitary confinement, but with more caffeine. The goal of NaNo is to write 50,000 words in 30 days. That’s 1667 words per day.

In short: it’s grueling.

But the rewards outweigh the mind-crushing, soul-smothering moderate difficulties.

Do you want to call yourself a writer? Here are 9 reasons why you should say “fork it” and plunge into NaNoWriMo:

Continue reading 9 strong reasons why writers should PLUNGE into NaNoWriMo

Strike with Lightning – Using Turning Points to Engage Your Readers

Twelve days in the desert, and I did not know how much farther I had to go. My horses were dead, my waterskins were empty, and my legs shook with every step. The string of mountains I had been following were dwindling, but I found refuge from the sun’s gaze in a cluster of sand-worn boulders.

Before me, the land wavered in the heat. Not a soul in sight. No plants, nor birds. I would have killed for any sign of life. Even a snake would’ve been welcome. Instead, I got a dust devil.

Wind swept down from the mountains, tangling itself up in the heat, until the two were locked in a kind of combat, spinning and throwing each other around, picking up dust, until there was a tower of sand rolling and revolving across the empty dance floor of the desert. The dust devil crackled with energy, and electric tongues licked out from the gathering sand.

Wind tugged on the buttons of my shirt and pulled on my hair. If I wasn’t so exhausted, I would’ve stood up. I could hear the energy crackling, I could feel it in my skin as the dust devil whipped closer to my shelter.

Continue reading Strike with Lightning – Using Turning Points to Engage Your Readers

Shepherd by Othman Mohammad

First, You Must Climb Down – Facing Your Unknowns

I was safe, and I was suffocating. Grass and mud stuck to my legs, and the wet dirt squelched under my sandals. I was on a hill, and all I could do was look, turning from one direction to the next, terrified of making the wrong move.

If I move, I will slip. I will fall down this hill, and I do not know if I will ever get up.

So I did not move.

Thumping footsteps heralded the approach of the man with the goat-skin hide. Stabbing his staff into the hillside, he ascended my hill, until he stopped, watching me shiver in the cold, dewy darkness, mud plastered up to my knees. The goat-man pointed the hooked end of his staff at me, and commanded me to identify myself.

“I am the writer.”

“What are you doing up here?” His head was covered by a hollowed-out goat’s head, and two huge, spiralling horns stuck out on either side of the skull.

“I’m stuck.”

His eyebrows knitted together, his beard twitched, and the goat horns bowed when he looked at my feet.

“No, you are not.”

“I can’t go on. I can not write, and I can not move, and I can not think.”

The goat man lifted a hand to stroke the fur on the back of his goat’s head, as he gazed over the foothills, sinking and rising out of a sea of mist. To me, they were like waves locked in place, growing taller and darker the further they went. The goat man picked something out of his beard and flicked it away into the darkness.

“This land is dangerous. All land is dangerous, if you have never explored it.

“This is a threatening country, in the night.” He picked something out of his beard and flicked it away into the darkness. “There are many dangers to be wary of. You are lucky. None of them will kill you. I know this land, and I know it’s dangers. I can not always see them, but I know what they are.”

“What should I do?” I asked, rubbing my hands over my chilled arms.

He shrugged, “What do you want to do?”

“I want to succeed. I want to be good. I want to write the best words that I can.”

The goat man smiled, nodding. I think my response had pleased him.

He spoke, “It is up to you. You can stay here, or you can climb down this hill. If you stay, you will never fail, you will remain above the mist. But you will never move.”

“So I should stay here?”

“Hah!” He barked, “If you stay here, you will never succeed! To succeed, you must fail. Many times. To go up, you must first climb down. And as you can see,” He gestured with his staff, “There are many hills, many ups, and many downs in your way.”

The goat-man pulled his goat-hide tighter around him, and began to walk down the hill.

“Wait!” I called, “What if I make the wrong step?”

“In the mist, you You may find a wolf, or you may find a sheep. You may find many wolves, and sheep, and other things too. But beyond the mists, something waits for you, Writer. Beyond the mists, there is a mountain, a mountain nobody has claimed.”

He turned and grinned at me, horns glinting in the moonlight, “It could be your mountain.

With a few squelching steps he descended into the mist. I took a breath, clutched my pen, and I followed.

Writing Challenge: When you reach a peak, when you finally succeed, you will find new fears. Fear is good, fear will help you grow as a writer, and as a person. You, and your characters, must learn from these fears.

So, go. Write something short, about a fear you are facing, or a fear your character is facing. What is your unknown? How will you explore it?

Image courtesy of Othman Mohammad via Flickr Creative Commons

What Motivates Your Character (and Is It Enough)?

You have reasons for coming here (you want to learn more about writing, to communicate as one author to another, or maybe you were baited by that tantalizing title). I have a reason for writing this post (to inform you, to give you a place to discuss, and to ensnare you with clickbait! HAH).

The point is, everything you and I do is brought on by some sort of motivation. We are human, we want, and we will always want.

Your characters should also want something (even if they aren’t human). Coming up with a motivation is easy: Is your thief greedy? Is your president obsessed with power? Is your romantic lead drawn to honor?

However, one motivation won’t cut it if you want to make your characters interesting. So what is the secret?

Continue reading What Motivates Your Character (and Is It Enough)?