Tag Archives: Story

How to (Actually) Cure Writer’s Block

“…There is no such thing as Writer’s block…”

At least, that’s what I keep hearing.

“It’s a lie. It’s an excuse. It doesn’t exist.”

Wrong.

Writer’s Block is real. Every writer ever has faced it.

But – there is a serious problem with calling it “Writer’s Block.”

Let me show you…

Continue reading How to (Actually) Cure Writer’s Block

A Professional Question of Murder – (Flash Fiction)

In this line of work there were few answers, and many questions.

One question, in particular, stuck out like a knife from a dead man’s chest: “Could you ever kill a friend?”

For years, Blay the Assassin thought about it, turning it over and over in the quiet hours of the long, cold nights. The unanswered question never diminished. Blay’s passion for the craft, however, did. He found himself a rich man, and even the luster of “professional power-shifting” had grown tiresome to him.

Blay the Assassin was done.

Or so he thought.

Continue reading A Professional Question of Murder – (Flash Fiction)

How Many Characters Should Your Story Have?

Quick: what is the most excitable organ in the body?

That’s right – it’s the imagination.

Sometimes, when you’re getting all hot and bothered creative, you get too eager (don’t worry, it happens to all of us).

You get this urge to create, and create, and create. Before you know it, you have a glut of characters:

  • 4 protagonists, with 4 distinct groups of companions
  • 6 love interests
  • 12 dwarves
  • And a guy named Frank because you couldn’t think of a better name, so you just used this as a place holder until a better name comes along…

Is that too many names? How many characters SHOULD your short story/novel/Harry Potter fan fiction have?

Continue reading How Many Characters Should Your Story Have?

Forlorn girl

How Can We Sing? (300 Word Fiction)

In such a strange land, they found themselves surrounded by nothing familiar. There was the sun, but it was wrong, and the mountains, those were wrong also.

Here, they could not hear The Song, and so they could not sing. Muhlirim knew they would die.

“But all must die, Muhlirim.”

“Yes, yes,” agreed the others, nodding in unison, with their bodies slumped on an unfamiliar hill under the wrong sun.

Muhlirim thought, bending his ear to one side, still half-listening for the song of familiar stars, though he knew he would not hear it. Not here, not so far away from home.

“All must die,” Muhlirim said, “But until we do, we must try to live. Do any of you want to die?”

“No, no,” again, in unison, the lost people spoke, their voices tired and empty and without a hint of music. Monotone.

“Muhlirim, how can we sing?” One of them asked, and nobody answered.

A wind howled over the unfamiliar hill, and they all shivered and their teeth chattered. Some animal that they could not see loosed a desperate cry, once, twice, and then no more.

A girl began to cry, and her father tried to comfort her, but her father, too, was overcome with grief, and he cried with her. One by one, Muhlirim’s people were overcome with grief, until the whole hill was filled with the discord of voices, mourning themselves.

“How can we sing, how can we sing,” Muhlirim asked himself, over and over, while his people withered under the wrong sun. He mumbled and muttered until all of his words became one, but not a true word, only a vibration.

A moan, in which he put all of his aching and yearning and determination, until it became something else. Until it became more than a cry. Until it was louder than the voices of all his people.

Until they all sang with him.

The End.

Thank you for reading. If you’re interested in more fiction, check out my latest short story, which you can download for free from Smashwords here, or read on my blog here.

Don’t forget to leave a like, follow the blog, and drop a comment on your way out! All criticism and thoughts are very appreciated. Don’t be shy! I want to know what you think. 

Half the Battle (Short Fiction: 150 Words)

It’s not Friday, it’s not a hundred words or less, but following rules was never really my strong suit. Here is my piece for last week’s ‘Friday Fictioneers’ prompt over at Rochelle’s blog. Maybe this week I’ll try to be on time. 

B and C were tied together at the ankle, waiting impatiently for Y and Z to do the same.

“What’s in the house?” C asked, leaning on her free leg while B was rushing the other pair to hurry up.

“B told me there was treasure. Is there treasure, B?” Y asked.

“YES,” an exasperated B, “but only the smartest group gets it, and that’s gonna be me and C.”

“Yea!” Said C.

“Nuh uh,” said Y.

“You kidding? Look how long it’s taking Z to tie that knot around your legs. I bet it’s not even a real knot,” B bent down and pretended to inspect it, but he didn’t actually know what a real knot was.

Without warning, B stood back up and shouted “Go!” while pulling C behind him.

Silent Z tugged at Y’s arm, and pulled her around the outside of the maze. They reached the house first, but the only treasure they found was the sound of B and C’s arguing voices, still lost in the hedges.

Thank you for reading! Tell me what you thought in the comments below, and don’t forget to like or follow the blog. Criticism is always a gift. And don’t forget to check out the other submissions here.

Image courtesy of Melanie Greenwood

Like Sharks in a Harbor (Flash Fiction)

Woong counted no less than four alarms when he poked his head into the observation deck. He could pick apart each one: proximity, emergency, something blocking the cargo doors.

But the last one, a sort of angry beeping that sounded important had the sound of authority, like it wasn’t supposed to be ignored.

He didn’t know what it was, and he definitely didn’t have time to figure it out. Woong had to find the system that controlled the cargo door, disengage whatever safety protocols this freighter had in place, and get the door to open.

The short range crackled in his ear, “Woong! How’s it going in there?”

“Found the obs, it’s clear. I’m looking for the door controls now.”

“Nice. Know what you’re looking for?”

Woong scratched his head, his eyes darting from one appliance to the next. The room was poorly lit, except for the hypnotic glare from monitors, and the light from the giant window that looked down into the main cargo bay.  “I’m looking for a computer right next to an override, but I don’t-”

Continue reading Like Sharks in a Harbor (Flash Fiction)

Writers, are you having trouble with productivity? Read this.

WAKE UP. 

Every day you don’t write, another innocent story dies. How could you, you heartless monster.

Who knows how much is lost because you put off writing.

Again.

The number one problem with writers is that we’re lazy, and we’ll never get anything done unless we discipline ourselves.  If you want to be a successful author, you will have to write everyday, sometimes for hours.

But how do you do that? How do you find the time, the discipline to do that?

Here are 65 authors to answer these questions and more:

http://www.focusalot.com/blog/accomplished-writers/

Remember: If you don’t write your stories, someone else will.

 

Follow, like, comment, and go write!

(Image by Araí Moleri Riva-Zucchelli via Flickr Creative Commons)