Reddit Work Interpret Writing

Who cares about authorial intent?

Last week, the ‘Front Page of the Internet’ went insane. Again.

This is the perfect time to talk about ownership, authorial intent, and why you have no control over what your audience thinks. And, hell, why not start a discussion?

Continue reading Who cares about authorial intent?

Haunted House

Someone I’ve Never Met Before (Short Fiction: Under 200 Words)

My agent’s face was sweating, trying to sell that house to me, even as my breath turned to vapor in the cold. The seclusion, the fact that you couldn’t see anything beyond the trees that grew around it, that’s why I wanted it.

Old house, haunted house. My agent hired a truck for me, but made many excuses to leave as soon as she could. I was the only one there, yet I was not alone.

That first night I remember trying to get warm under sheets that never seemed thick enough, with my breath coalescing in the frigid air, hanging over me like a specter.

In the moment just before sleep buried me with unconscious, I felt the sheets lift, ever so gently, and her cold, ethereal form slip next to me.

I heard a voice, like ice sliding over ice, “I’ve missed you.”

I’ve written plenty of ‘weird’ fiction, but never anything that came close to horror. 

So? Did you feel anything? What, if anything in this short piece, made you think? Leave your thoughts below in the comments, and don’t forget to like and follow the blog.

Image courtesy of Martyn Smith via Flickr Creative Commons. 

Mapping Character Change Using Psychological Theory by Phil Lowe

P. S. Hoffman:

Need help developing your characters? Read this fantastic post from Scriptangel’s Blog, and learn how to use realistic personality changes to round out your writing.

Originally posted on Scriptangel's Blog:

I’ve tended to focus in this series on personality models which emphasise how different we all are, as it’s generally the differences between characters which lead to drama. But let’s break the rule for the last in the series and look at a model which says we are all exactly the same when it comes to responding to a change in our circumstances – and which creates drama through a battle we have with our own psyche.

If you’re doing your job as a writer, your characters will spend a lot of time wrestling with some kind of change: losing a job, getting a job, receiving bad news, meeting a new partner, finishing with an existing partner, having an accident, being betrayed… Without change there is no drama. And our ability to understand the impact of change on a person comes from the “transition curve”, courtesy of a doctor who…

View original 871 more words

Laughing Boy

Letter to a Loved One (Flash Fiction: Under 100 Words)

You don’t know how long I’ve been waiting for you.

You, so slow and laughably unintelligent. Yet, I don’t know where I would be without you.

Your glow, like the sickly light of a bug zapper, a blinding beacon in the dark.

Your warmth, almost unbearable, but that’s just how you are (not when we first met, but for now, and until the day you die). And your humming, so quiet, but always there. Always, always there.

You don’t know how long I’ve been waiting for you, my beloved computer. I’ve missed you so.

The End.

Blah blah thanks for reading. Blah blah download free short story. Nobody is reading this. Like, Follow, Comment. Or don’t! No, wait, please do, it means a lot to me. Talk to you soon! 

Image courtesy of Kannan Muthuraman via Flickr Creative Commons


How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Outline

Didn’t you know? A bad outline is the death of a good story.

How can you be creative when everything is already planned out for you?

No emotion in the writer, no emotion in the reader.

How can you follow this rule when you already know everything that’s going to happen?

Like an overbearing parent, a detailed outline can suck all the danger and excitement out of your next story. Here’s a post from NY Book Editors that explains all the problems writers, especially newer writers, cause for themselves whenever they outline their work.

So that’s it? All this talk about how dangerous outlines are, let’s just forget about them?

Please. If not for your sake, think of your readers. You gotta outline.

WHY? You’re a creative person, and you’ve got a million ideas, and whenever you sit down to write, you always seem to come up with more. What do YOU need an outline for?

Continue reading How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Outline

Forlorn girl

How Can We Sing? (300 Word Fiction)

In such a strange land, they found themselves surrounded by nothing familiar. There was the sun, but it was wrong, and the mountains, those were wrong also.

Here, they could not hear The Song, and so they could not sing. Muhlirim knew they would die.

“But all must die, Muhlirim.”

“Yes, yes,” agreed the others, nodding in unison, with their bodies slumped on an unfamiliar hill under the wrong sun.

Muhlirim thought, bending his ear to one side, still half-listening for the song of familiar stars, though he knew he would not hear it. Not here, not so far away from home.

“All must die,” Muhlirim said, “But until we do, we must try to live. Do any of you want to die?”

“No, no,” again, in unison, the lost people spoke, their voices tired and empty and without a hint of music. Monotone.

“Muhlirim, how can we sing?” One of them asked, and nobody answered.

A wind howled over the unfamiliar hill, and they all shivered and their teeth chattered. Some animal that they could not see loosed a desperate cry, once, twice, and then no more.

A girl began to cry, and her father tried to comfort her, but her father, too, was overcome with grief, and he cried with her. One by one, Muhlirim’s people were overcome with grief, until the whole hill was filled with the discord of voices, mourning themselves.

“How can we sing, how can we sing,” Muhlirim asked himself, over and over, while his people withered under the wrong sun. He mumbled and muttered until all of his words became one, but not a true word, only a vibration.

A moan, in which he put all of his aching and yearning and determination, until it became something else. Until it became more than a cry. Until it was louder than the voices of all his people.

Until they all sang with him.

The End.

Thank you for reading. If you’re interested in more fiction, check out my latest short story, which you can download for free from Smashwords here, or read on my blog here.

Don’t forget to leave a like, follow the blog, and drop a comment on your way out! All criticism and thoughts are very appreciated. Don’t be shy! I want to know what you think. 

Tom Hardy in Mad Max: Fury Road

What’s Wrong with Mad Max: Fury Road?

Redemption [ri-demp-shuh n] noun. –

1. an act of redeeming or atoning for a fault or mistake, or the state of being redeemed.

This is for you, George Miller. I don’t know if you chose the wrong theme for your film, or you forgot what you were writing halfway through, but if you want a lesson on choosing a theme, then go read this. It might help you focus on the right theme next time (the word you were looking for was ‘salvation,’ not redemption).

Now that’s out of the way, let me tell you what I thought about Mad Max: Fury Road:

Continue reading What’s Wrong with Mad Max: Fury Road?

Mad Max Fury Road - Abbey Lee Kershaw Wallpaper

Why You Need a Theme – And How It Can Kill Your Writing

This was the last thing Swen said to me, before he jumped off the cliff: “I’m going to do something that you will never forget. Witness me.”

As he fell upon the war band, I watched as a car, covered in spikes, collided with his body. I watched as the explosives fell from his hand, undetonated, and his body impaled on the car’s spear-covered hood.

But Swen died with a smile on his silver-stained lips. And he did not die in vain.

Weeks passed, the brothers were killed, and the fortress fell, but still, I could not rid myself of Swen’s dying words. It was only after the water began to run again, when the sanded bluffs turned from red to green did I fully realize Swen’s message.

Continue reading Why You Need a Theme – And How It Can Kill Your Writing

Democracy Monument at Night. Bangkok, Thailand.

Starting Your Next BIG Project – 3 Simple Steps

Do you want to write a book? You want to start a blog? You’ve been thinking about this project for a while, but it seems so huge, you don’t know where to start (or maybe, you’re just too afraid)?


The size of this task may be threatening, but you are the Architect, you are inspired by the greatness of others, and you see this project as a challenge, an opportunity to become great yourself.

So, Architect, how do you build your monument? What is the first step you take?

Continue reading Starting Your Next BIG Project – 3 Simple Steps